Remembering The Fallen 

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The Sept. 13, 2001 edition of the Great Neck Record
The Sept. 13, 2001 edition of the Great Neck Record

For many local residents, memorializing Long Island’s victims of the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, goes beyond solemnly reading the names of those lost. At gatherings throughout Long Island, officials and community members will acknowledge the shared experience of losing loved ones to senseless hatred.

This personal nature is what town officials believe sets Long Island’s remembrance ceremonies apart.

The Sept. 20, 2001 edition of the Great Neck Record
The Sept. 20, 2001 edition of the Great Neck Record

“There is a commonality and a bond between all of us because the people who were lost, they all learned to ride a bike on the same roads as us, they went to the same burger joints as us and they had their first kiss in the same parks as us,” said Town of Oyster Bay Supervisor John Venditto, who will host a memorial at Tobay Beach on Sept. 7 at 7 p.m. “It makes it so personal.”

In the Town of North Hempstead, a memorial service will be held at Mary Jane Davies Green on Plandome Road on Sunday, Sept. 11, at 8 a.m. Supervisor Judi Bosworth said to mark the 15th anniversary, the town will do as it has always done and gather to respectfully honor and remember the nearly 3,000 people who lost their lives in New York, in Washington, DC, and over the skies of Pennsylvania.

Eisenhower Park’s 9/11 memorial
Eisenhower Park’s 9/11 memorial

“Among those victims were 56 members of our own community here in North Hempstead who were our neighbors, friends, coworkers and beloved family members,” she said. “They have not been forgotten.”

According to Bosworth, the slow healing process is attributed to the fact that terrorism throughout the world has not yielded since that attack on the country—instead, it persists and will forever remind citizens of the fragility of everyday peace.

A steel beam from the World Trade Center is displayed at the Tobay Beach memorial.
A steel beam from the World Trade Center is displayed at the Tobay Beach memorial.

“Fifteen years after September 11, the hate and carnage continue, not only on American soil, but throughout the world,” she said. “Our vigilance against terrorism must be stronger than ever and our commitment to stand together with other nations targeted by terrorists must be unyielding.”

Other events memorializing 9/11 victims and survivors include the Eisenhower Park Sunset Candlelight and Remembrance Ceremony on Thursday, Sept. 8. at 6:30 p.m.; the Point Lookout September Sunrise Memorial at Town Park at Point Lookout on Sunday, Sept. 11, at 7:30 a.m.; a Floral Park service at the 9/11 Relic Memorial in front of village hall on Sunday, Sept. 11, at 8:30 a.m.; a service of remembrance at Wantagh Memorial Congregational Church on Sunday, Sept. 11, at 10:30 a.m.; and a memorial sculpture unveiling at the Plainview-Old Bethpage Library on Sunday, Sept. 11, at 4:30 p.m.

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