Historical Society To Review Significant Buildings

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Great Neck’s Korean United Methodist Church on Northern Boulevard will receive the Historical Society’s second annual Outstanding Restoration Award.
Great Neck’s Korean United Methodist Church on Northern Boulevard will receive the Historical Society’s second annual Outstanding Restoration Award.

Heritage recognition plaques have been presented to many historically significant buildings on the Great Neck peninsula in recent years by the Great Neck Historical Society. The organization invites the community to a virtual tour of those buildings at a special presentation on Wednesday, Sept. 14, at 7:30 p.m. at Great Neck House.

“The Great Neck Historical Society recognizes houses of worship, buildings and significant places in our community that are of architectural, historical or cultural interest. Each one is important in its own way,” said Joan Wheeler, the chair of the organization’s Heritage Recognition Program. “Through our program, both residents and visitors can learn and appreciate the myriad elements that have formed Great Neck’s unique character and rich history, beginning in 1643.”

Great Neck Historical Society President Alice Kasten will present a plaque, to be affixed outside the Korean United Methodist Church, recognizing its restoration.
Great Neck Historical Society President Alice Kasten will present a plaque, to be affixed outside the Korean United Methodist Church, recognizing its restoration.

In addition, the Historical Society has initiated an annual Outstanding Restoration Award, recognizing structures that have been exceptionally restored to their former beauty. At the meeting, Historical Society President Alice Kasten will present the organization’s second Restoration Award to Great Neck’s Korean United Methodist Church, located on Northern Boulevard between Summer and Susquehanna Streets, for the restoration of their Sunday School Building.

Great Neck’s first co-op apartment building, the luxurious Kenwood Gardens, was recognized by the Great Neck Historical Society.
Great Neck’s first co-op apartment building, the luxurious Kenwood Gardens, was recognized by the Great Neck Historical Society.

Other buildings which have been recognized and will be reviewed include:

• Kenwood Gardens on 160 Middle Neck Rd., which was built in 1926 as a luxury apartment building and is the oldest co-op on Long Island. It was the vision of real estate mogul Charles E. Finlay, who was a developer of the Village of Kensington.

Great Neck North High School
Great Neck North High School

• Great Neck North High School on 35 Polo Rd. was constructed in 1929 on the former William Gould Brokaw estate to replace the crowded school on the corner of Arrandale Avenue and Middle Neck Road.

The home of Gloria and Norman Gersman on 17 Arrandale Ave., which the couple researched and lovingly restored, was selected for the Historical Society’s first Outstanding Restoration Award.
The home of Gloria and Norman Gersman on 17 Arrandale Ave., which the couple researched and lovingly restored, was selected for the Historical Society’s first Outstanding Restoration Award.

• 17 Arrandale Ave. is a private home and the recipient of the Historical Society’s first Outstanding Restoration Award. Owners Gloria and Norman Gersman did extensive research to ensure that the recreation of their 1912 house was both exquisite and authentic.

• 15 Deer Park Rd. is a house with six chimneys plus a beautiful, rare multicolored slate roof located on the property that belonged to W.R. Grace of the Grace Shipping Lines.

St. Aloysius
St. Aloysius

• St. Aloysius Roman Catholic Church was designed by distinguished New York architect Gustave Steinbach in 1913. It’s where many of Great Neck’s famous residents attended services, including James Cagney, Zelda and F. Scott Fitzgerald, George M. Cohan and Kate Smith.

Recognition by the Historical Society does not impose any restrictions on the property, but is a justifiable source of pride to the homeowner. All of the buildings which have received plaques are pictured on the Historical Society’s website. For more information, visit www.greatneckhistorical.org.

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